Power management reference (snap/3.0/UI)

2.9 3.0
DEB CLI ~ UI CLI ~ UI
SNAP CLI ~ UI CLI ~ UI

To manage a machine, MAAS must be able to power cycle it, usually through the machine’s BMC card. Until you configure the power type, a newly-added machine can’t be enlisted and used by MAAS.

Five questions you may have:

  1. How do I configure a machine’s power type?
  2. Show me a catalogue of power parameters, by type.
  3. Can you give me an example of the virsh power type?
  4. Which BMC drivers are supported?
  5. How do I configure and use IBM Z with MAAS?

Configure a machine’s power type

To configure a machine’s power type, click on the machine from the ‘Machines’ page of the web UI, then select its ‘Configuration’ tab. Scroll down until you find the Power configuration. If the power type is undefined, the following will be displayed:

Choose a type in the drop-down menu that corresponds to the machine’s underlying machine’s BMC card.

Fill in the resulting form; the information required will depends on the power type:

CLI power_type code Description
amt Intel AMT
apc American Power Conversion (APC) PDU
dli Digital Loggers, Inc. PDU
hmc IBM Hardware Management Console (HMC)
lxd LXD VM
ipmi IPMI
manual Manual power configuration
moonshot HP Moonshot - iLO4 (IPMI)
mscm HP Moonshot - iLO Chassis Manager
msftocs Microsoft OCS - Chassis Manager
nova OpenStack Nova
openbmc OpenBMC Power Driver
proxmox ProxMox Power Driver
recs_box Christmann RECS-Box Power Driver
redfish Redfish
sm15k SeaMicro 15000
ucsm Cisco UCS Manager
virsh libvirt KVM
vmware VMware
webhook Webhook
wedge Facebook’s Wedge

Click ‘Save changes’ to finish. Once that’s done, MAAS performs a power check on the machine. A successful power check is a good indication that MAAS can properly communicate with the machine, that is, it should quickly result in a power status of “Power off”. A failed attempt will show:

If you see this error, double-check your entered values by editing the power type, or consider another power type altogether.

Another possible cause for this error may be the networking: traffic may be getting filtered between the rack controller and the BMC card.

Power catalogue

The following catalogue helps to explain the fields in the “create machine” dialogue above. Note that most of the multiple-choice fields have drop-down menus to assist with your choice.

Intel AMT

Form field Description Required
Power password Password to access unit Optional
Power address IP address of unit Required

American Power Conversion (APC) PDU

Form field Description Required
IP for APC PDU IP address of unit Required
APU PDU node outlet number (1-16) PDU node outlet number Required
Power ON outlet delay (seconds) outlet power ON delay Optional, default=5

Digital Loggers, Inc. PDU

Form field Description Required
Outlet ID outlet ID Required
Power address IP address of unit Required
Power user Username to login Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional

IBM Hardware Management Console (HMC)

Form field Description Required
IP for HMC IP address of unit Required
HMC username Username to login Optional
HMC password Password to access unit Optional
HMC Managed System server name HMC managed server name Required
HMC logical partition HMC logical partition of unit Required

LXD VMs

Form field Description Required
LXD address IP address of unit Required
Instance name LXD container instance name Required
LXD password Password to access unit Optional

IPMI

Some of the fields for this power type have fixed choices, indicated in the “Choices” column.

Form field Description Choices Required
Power driver Power driver LAN [IPMI 1.5] Required
LAN_2_0 [IPMI 2.0]
Power boot type Boot type Automatic Required
Legacy boot
EFI boot
IP address IP address of unit Required
Power user Username to login Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional
Power MAC MAC address of unit Optional
K_g K_g BMC key Optional (BETA)
Cipher suite Cipher suite ID - 17 (17 - HMAC-SHA256::HMAC_SHA256_128::AES-CBC-128) Optional (BETA)
3 (3 - HMAC-SHA1::HMAC-SHA1-96::AES-CBC-128)
(blank) (freeipmi-tools default)
8 (8 - HMAC-MD5::HMAC-MD5-128::AES-CBC-128)
12 (12 - HMAC-MD5::MD5-128::AES-CBC-128)
Privilege level IPMI privilege level User Optional (BETA)
Operator
Administrator

Manual power configuration

Manual power configuration means exactly that – manually configured at the unit – hence there are no parameters to set in the “create machine” UI.

HP Moonshot - iLO4 (IPMI)

Form field Description Required
Power address IP address of unit Required
Power user Username to login Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional
Power hardware address Hardware address of unit Required

HP Moonshot - iLO Chassis Manager

Form field Description Required
IP for MSCM CLI API IP address of unit Required
MSCM CLI API user Username to login Optional
MSCM CLI API password Password to access unit Optional
Node ID cXnY Required
- where X = cartridge number
Y = node number

Microsoft OCS - Chassis Manager

Form field Description Required
Power address IP address of unit Required
Power port Port where unit is attached Optional
Power user Username to login Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional
Blade ID Blade ID (usu. 1-24) Required

OpenStack Nova

Form field Description Required
Host UUID Host UUID Required
Tenant name Tenant name Required
Username Username to login Required
Password Password to access unit Required
Auth URL URL to access unit Required

Proxmox

Form field Description Required
Power type Proxmox Required
Host name or IP Power address for the Proxmox driver Required
Username, including realm Power user, along with realm (i.e., Username@Realm Required
Password Required if a token name and secret aren’t given Provisional
API token name Token name: must include Username without realm (i.e., Username!Token-name Provisional
API token secret Token secret Provisional
Node ID VM name or ID Optional
Verify SSL connections… Boolean, whether or not to verify SSL connections with the system’s root CA certificate Required

OpenBMC Power Driver

Form field Description Required
OpenBMC address IP address of unit Required
OpenBMC user Username to login Required
OpenBMC password Password to access unit Required

Christmann RECS-Box Power Driver

Form field Description Required
Node ID Node ID Required
Power address IP address of unit Required
Power port Port where unit is attached Optional
Power user Username to login Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional

Redfish

Form field Description Required
Redfish address IP address of unit Required
Redfish user Username to login Required
Redfish password Password to access unit Required
Node ID Node ID Optional

SeaMicro 15000

Some of the fields for this power type have fixed choices, indicated in the “Choices” column.

Form field Description Choices Required
System ID System ID Required
Power address IP address of unit Required
Power user Username to login Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional
Power control type Password to access unit IPMI Required
REST API v0.9
REST API v2.0

Cisco UCS Manager

Form field Description Required
Server UUID Server UUID Required
URL for XML API XML API URL Required
API user API user Optional
API password API password Optional

virsh - libvirt KVM

Form field Description Required
Address URL of VM Required
Password API password Optional
Virsh VM ID libvirt VM UUID Required

VMware

Form field Description Required
VM Name VM name (if UUID unknown) Optional
VM UUID VM UUID (if known) Optional
VMware IP IP address of VM Required
VMware username Username to access VM Required
VMware password Password to access VM Required
VMware API port VMware API port number Optional
VMware API protocol VMware API protocol Optional

Facebook’s Wedge

Form field Description Required
IP address IP address of unit Required
Power user Username to access unit Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional

An example: the Virsh power type

Consider a machine backed by VM. Below, a ‘Power type’ of Virsh has been selected, and the ‘Power address’ of qemu+ssh://ubuntu@192.168.1.2/system has been entered (replace values as appropriate). The value of ‘Power ID’ is the VM domain (guest) name, here node2.

The machine’s hostname – according to MAAS – is a randomly chosen string (here dear.ant). You should change this hostname to something descriptive, that helps you remember why this machine is in your MAAS network.

Webhook

It’s important to understand that the Webhook power driver is more generic than other drivers, so it has some flexibility that the underlying power driver may not support. For example, Webhook doesn’t require a username or password for the power driver, because not all power drivers work that way. Nevertheless, the power driver you’re connecting to Webhook may actually require a username and/or password. Understanding and implementing these fields correctly for the chosen back-end power driver is the user’s responsibility.

To that end, the “Required” column for this driver refers only to whether Webhook requires a value in each field. Just because a field is optional for Webhook itself does not mean that the underlying power driver will ultimately allow that field to be unspecified.

Form field Description Required (by Webhook)
Power type Webhook (from drop-down list) Required
URI to power on the node URI to access power driver’s API for power on Required
URI to power off the node URI to access power driver’s API for power off Required
URI to query the nodes power status URI to access power driver’s API for power status Required
Regex to confirm the node is on Regex expression that will return a string if the power is on, and no string if the power is off Required, defaults supplied
Regex to confirm the node is off Regex expression that will return a string if the power is off, and no string if the power is on Required, defaults supplied
Power user Username to log into the power driver Optional
Power password Password to access unit Optional
Power token Power driver API token (used instead of user and password, if set) Optional
Verify SSL connections… Boolean, whether or not to verify SSL connections with the system’s root CA certificate Required

Which BMC drivers are supported

MAAS supports many types of BMC hardware, though not all the drivers have the same capabilities. See the below table for a feature comparison of the BMC drivers currently supported by MAAS.

Tell me about BMC

BMC, or “Baseboard Management Controller,” is an extra micro-controller on the motherboard of a server which forms the interface between system-management software and the device’s hardware. The BMC can collect data from attached sensors, alert administrators to issues, and respond to remote-control commands to control system operation or power state, independent of the system’s CPU.

In the context of MAAS, the BMC is generally controlled by SNMP commands. Any given BMC will function in the context of one or more “power types,” which are physical interfaces that permit use of the IPMI (“Intelligent Platform Management Interface”) protocol. Each power type has a different set of expected parameters required to access and command the BMC.

Power Driver (X=supported) PXE Next Boot Power Querying Chassis/Pod Configuration Enhanced UI Error Reporting BMC Enlistment
American Power Conversion (APC) - PDU
Cisco UCS Manager X X X
Digital Loggers, Inc. - PDU
Facebook's Wedge *
HP Moonshot - iLO Chassis Manager X X X
HP Moonshot - iLO4 (IPMI) X X X
IBM Hardware Management Console (HMC) X X
IPMI X X X X
Intel AMT X X X
Manual
Microsoft OCS - Chassis Manager X X X
OpenStack Nova X
Rack Scale Design X X X
SeaMicro 15000 X X X
Sentry Switch CDU - PDU
VMWare X X X
Virsh (virtual systems) X X X

* The ‘Facebook’s Wedge’ OpenBMC power driver is considered experimental at this time.

How do I configure and use IBM Z with MAAS?

The IBM Z or LinuxONE system can host MAAS controllers and is able to deploy predefined logical partitions (LPARs) KVM host(s), and virtual machines, if the mainframe is set up properly for MAAS.

The basic architecture is similar to this:

Networking would be structured like this:

Note that net-booting the KVM guests (through the two bridges) can be problematic. There are two options:

  1. Adding VNIC characteristics to enable “learning” on the network interface that’s the base for bridge “br2.” This is the recommended approach.

  2. Enable full promiscuous bridge port mode at the network interface that’s the base for bridge “br2.” This approach is not recommended because it has some built-in limitations.

MAAS will automatically configure option 1 for you, in case an LPAR is deployed as KVM host (the bridge names may differ).

In order to achieve this configuration, there are a number of steps that must be executed; specifically, you must know how to:

The MAAS controller does not necessarily need to run on an LPAR on the IBM Z system itself, but can also run on a different system outside. But since the MAAS controller requires a network connection to the hardware management console (HMC), it is recommended to keep it co-located and (for security reasons) as close as possible to the HMC and run it in a dedicated LPAR.

Such a MAAS controller LPAR should have at least two SMT hardware threads (one IFL), since it runs several services (bind, rack-, region-controller and more), 16 GB RAM and 100 GB disk space - recommended is to use the double amount of these resources.

The resources of the LPARs to deploy on (‘machines’ in terms of MAAS) depending on the use case. LPARs that are deployed as KVM host would of course require significantly more resources to be able to host KVM guest on top.

There are several constraints on the definition and setup of the ‘machine’ LPARs - please see below.

Evaluate IBM Z requirements

The system requirements to host MAAS and its virtual machines on the IBM Z platform are as follows:

  • IBM z14 GA2 (or newer) or IBM LinuxONE III (or newer)
  • HMC running in DPM mode (mandatory, traditional mode is not supported!)
  • HMC firmware level H39 - (HMC at H40 and SE at S55)
  • HMCs Rest-API enabled
  • python-zhmcclient (0.29 or later) running on the MAAS controller system, connected to the HMC
  • HMC user ID for the zhmcclient access to the HMC API (must have permissions for the “Manage Web Services API Logs” role and “Manage Web Services API Logs” role)
  • I/O auto-configuration enabled for the ‘machine’ LPARs
  • zFCP (SCSI) disk storage (only, no DASD support), recommended are two disks, one defined as type ‘boot,’ the second as type ‘data’
  • a dedicated storage group per ‘machine’ LPAR; these must include the dedicated zFCP storage for this particular managed LPAR only (‘boot’ and ‘data’ for LPAR n) - but no additional shared storage!
  • qeth network devices (Hipersockets or OSA, recommended); at least one qeth NIC, recommended two (or more)
  • Ubuntu Server 20.04 installed on a dedicated system (LPAR or PC), that acts as MAAS Controller
  • one or more LPARs as ‘machines’ (aka MAAS deployment targets)

Be aware that these are minimum system requirements.

Access the HMC and login to the IBM Z

To login to the HMC, you must have at least “system programmer” privileges. Gaining that level of access is beyond the scope of this document. Once you are sure that you have the necessary access, you first need to navigate to the Hardware Management Console (HMC) application in your Web browser:

Click on the “Log on…” link, which will bring you to a login screen:

Upon successfully logging on, you will land on the Welcome Screen:

Select the “Tasks Index” on the left-hand navigation:

From here, you will be able to access the commands needed to prepare your IBM Z to host MAAS.

Set up a suitable IBM Z partition for a MAAS machine

In order to prevent MAAS from taking over the entire system, you must assign both the controller and the ‘machines’ / KVM hosts to specific partitions, with suitable limitations. To set up suitable IBM Z partitions for hosting MAAS, you must choose “Partition Details” from the “Tasks Index,” which will bring you to a screen like this one:

You must then choose the “target object” (in this case we’ve chosen TA05) to be operated upon:

Click “OK,” and you’ll arrive at a screen similar to the one below:

Make sure you’re on the “Partitions” tab, and select the desired object (“TA05…”):

Right-click on the selected object and select “Partition Details:”

On the “General” tab, edit the partition details to suit your proposed MAAS deployment:

Next, you will set up the networking details for this partition, as shown in the following section.

Set up IBM Z networking for a MAAS machine

To properly enable networking within the IBMZ partitions, you must change to the “Network” tab under “Partition Details:”

Click on the NIC of interest to bring up the “NIC Details” screen:

Confirm that the parameters on this screen are consistent with your planned MAAS deployment, then bring up the network adapter(either OSA or Hipersockets) by selecting it:

Ensure that all settings on the “General” tab conform to your planned MAAS deployment; then select the “Network Interface Cards” tab on the left-hand navigation:

Again, ensure that the parameters associated with the networking arrangement are consistent with your planned MAAS deployment.

Next, you will set up the storage layout for your MAAS partition(s).

Set up IBM Z storage for a MAAS machine

To set up suitable storage for a MAAS deployment, you should bring up the “Partition Details” for your chosen MAAS partition and select the “Storage” tab from the left-hand navigation:

Choose the “VOLUMES” sub-tab, and lick on the hyperlinked partition name to bring up the storage configuration tab:

Click on “GET DETAILS” for the Boot Volume in the Volume list to bring up the “Configuration details” screen:

Ensure that the Boot Volume is configured appropriately for your planned MAAS deployment, then click “Done.” Then return to the storage configuration tab and choose the Data Volume, and tune it to the appropriate parameters.

Next, choose the “ADAPTERS” sub-tab to bring up information on the storage adapters:

Set any necessary parameters to conform to your planned MAAS deployment.

Set the partition boot parameters

Return to the “Partition Details” screen and select the “Boot” tab in the left-hand navigation:

Change any settings as necessary to support your planned MAAS deployment.

Set up your IBM Z virtual machine for enlistment

To cause IBM Z KVM partition guests to enlist, it’s necessary to manually put in the BMC information for each guest. MAAS can then detect the guest, enlist it, and boot it as necessary.


Last updated a month ago.